Worldview and Overcoming The Darth Vader Complex

It creates an incredible opportunity for Financial Advisors

Worldview is a belief or bias that an individual brings to a particular situation.

Approximately 90% of the Financial Services market, including your clients and prospects, share the “not trusted” worldview of the Industry – that Advisors are out for themselves, they’re takers.

We call it  “The Darth Vader Complex”. This includes your clients and your prospects.

Though your business may be growing, “The Darth Vader Complex” limits your growth.

Great opportunity lies in effectively addressing this worldview.

When learned and practiced it becomes the unmatched marker that differentiates advisors.

However, using facts and figures won’t work.
You’ll be invisible.
We should know this by now.

A Great Marketing Story works. (read post 12/28)
When it’s right, you are a standout.

ClientCentricMarketing
Simple and Effective

All Marketers Tell Stories. Some Do It Right. *

All marketers tell stories. And if they do it right, we believe them. We believe that wine tastes better in a $20 glass than a $1 glass. We believe that an $80,000 Porsche is vastly superior to a $36,000 Volkswagen that’s virtually the same car. We believe that $225 sneakers make our feet feel better—and look cooler—than a $25 brand. And we believe it!

Every consumer has a worldview that affects the product you want to sell.

Today I’ll share a few quotes from Seth Godin’s book “All Marketers Are Liars”.

They will help you understand why you must reinforce what your target market already believes.

Godin writes that “worldview is the term I use to refer to the rules, values, beliefs and biases that an individual consumer brings to a situation. A worldview is not who you are. It’s what you believe. It’s your biases”.

Here are several thought-provoking quotes from Godin’s book:

This on why stories should agree with your customer’s worldview:

Great stories agree with our worldview. The best stories don’t teach people anything new. Instead, the best stories agree with what the audience already believes and makes the members of the audience feel smart and secure when reminded how right they were in the first place.

This on why you shouldn’t try to change someone’s worldview (even if the facts and data reveal they are wrong):

Don’t try to change someone’s worldview is the strategy most smart marketers follow. Don’t try to use facts to prove your case and to insist that people change their biases. You don’t have enough time and you don’t have enough money. Instead, identify a population with a certain worldview, frame your story in terms of the worldview and you win.

This, on preconceived worldviews:

Worldviews are the reason that two intelligent people can look at the same data and walk away with completely different conclusions—it’s not that they didn’t have access to the data or that they have poor reasoning skill, it’s simply that they had already put themselves into a particular worldview before you even asked the question.

Finally and most importantly:

Every consumer has a worldview that affects the product you want to sell. That worldview alters the way they interpret everything you say and do. Frame your story in terms of that worldview, and it will be heard.

 *edited from targetmarketingmag.com/author/garyhennerberg/
The Bellis Method™
Simple and Effective Marketing.

9 Tips For A Remarkable Financial Service Practice*

Is your business remarkable?

Remarkable always gets talked about. Marketing starts with having a service that is ‘better’ than the competition, giving clients what they really want, being remarkable and worthy of being discussed by your clients and potential clients.

1. Making promises and keeping them…
is a great way to build a brand. This is one of the ‘first and foremost’ branding lessons. Emphasis on making promises as well as keeping them is required.

2. Your best clients…
are worth far more than your average clients. It starts with knowing who your clients are, then knowing the best of the group.

3. Conversations among the members of your marketplace.
Conversations happen whether you like it or not. Good marketing encourages the right sort of conversations, the ones that create the basis for your word of mouth marketing.

4. You’re viewing marketing as an expense.
Good marketers realize that marketing is an investment.

5. Clients don’t buy what they need.
They buy what they want. Gather as many insights as possible by observing what they do.

6. New ways of spreading your messages and ideas.
Blogs, permission-based RSS information*, consumer fan clubs are quickly proving how well they work. Traditional ways of interrupting consumers (TV ads, trade show booths, junk mail) are losing their cost-effectiveness.

7. The best Marketers convey their messages by telling stories. 
It’s the best way. It’s not even close.

8. Always choose your clients.
They increase your ability to deliver the right story to the others.

9. Reminding the client.
Telling a story they know and trust is a powerful shortcut. The best clients and client knowledge is based on the best relationships.

*Edited from unattributed source. (It sounds like Seth Godin but not sure)
**RSS Stands for Really Simple Syndication. It’s a way to easily distribute a list of headlines update notices and sometimes content to a wide number of people.
The Bellis Method™
Build A Remarkable Business From The Inside Out

 

Your Brand Is What Other People Say About You When You Are Not In The Room*

 Brand building is the deliberate effort to create the desired perception in someone else’s mind.

“A Simple Blueprint For A Successful Brand.” **

Brand building is the deliberate effort to create the desired perception in someone else’s mind.

It’s been said that “A Brand is not just a logo, a website, or your business cards… It’s an experience.”

To build a great brand you need the right blueprint for shaping perceptions about your service or your product.

The best blueprint begins with just three components: what, how and feeling.

Consider the example of Southwest airlines. What service do they provide? Well, it’s pretty simple: they move you from here to there.

That is Southwest’s what.

The what of a brand is typically straightforward. The most successful brands tend to represent only one what in their customers’ minds.

After what comes how.

Understanding the how of a brand begins with seeing that for every product or service, there can be many ways of delivering the what. “Overnight,” “cheaper,” “organic” – these are the types of words used to signal the specific how for which a business wants their product or services to be known.
For the most part, hows tend to travel into twos. One how is not quite enough, but more than two is unnecessary.

For Southwest Airlines, the first how is: “by air.”

Southwest began flying its first passengers on short hauls to and from second-tier airports in Texas where the competition was more likely a Greyhound than another airline.

There is a deep branding lesson. The customer is trying to accomplish a specific result – a specific what. The hows compete with one another. Nothing else does.

Southwest has a second how: “at a low price.”

Take away either of Southwest’s two distinct hows, or their performance aspects, and the brand – that is our perception of Southwest – starts to fall apart. Only Southwest is offering the entire package at once- the what and how that differentiate their brand in the minds of the customers.

What and how are the fundamentals of a sound brand blueprint, but the most successful brands include a third component: feeling.

Customers want to do business with people they like. Who doesn’t? Similarly, we prefer to consume products and services we feel good about. Southwest customers like the Southwest brand. The brand is fun and laid-back; it makes people feel good.

So, to summarize: brand building is the deliberate effort to create the desired perception in the mind of another person. The blueprint for creating the perception has three basic elements: what, how, and feeling.

**Edited from a post on Forbes.com by Jerry McLaughlin
*Quote from Jeff Bezos
The Bellis Method™
Simple and effective brand building